Ethics Ch 10-14 Ethics Chapter 10-14

Ethics Ch 10-14 Ethics Chapter 10-14

Question Answer
euthanasia directly or indirectly bringing about the death of another person for that persons sake
voluntary euthanasia euthanasia performed on a person with his or her permission
nonvoluntary euthanasia euthanasia performed on a person who is not competent to decide the issue and has left no instructions regarding end-of-life preferences. Family or physicians usually make the decision.
active euthanasia euthanasia performed by taking a direct action to cause someone's death
passive euthanasia euthanasia performed by withholding or withdrawing measures necessary for sustaining life
physician-assisted suicide the killing of a person by that person's own hand with the help of a physician
the arguments for euthanasia terminal illness, autonomy, humane, democracy
the arguments against euthanasia playing God, slippery slope, not necessary to die from intolerable pain
death the whole brain
abolitionists those who wish to abolish capital punishment
retentionists those who wish to retain the death penalty
punishment the deliberate and authorized causing or pain or harm to someone thought to have broken a law
capital punishment punishment by the execution of someone officially judged to have committed a serious, or capital, crime
retributivism the view that offenders deserve to be punished for their crimes and to be punished in proportion to the severity of their offenses
the difference between the two types of retributivism lex talionis- an eye for an eye; proportional retributivism- punishment fits crime
the principle of minimal invasion punishment is less invasive
the arguments for capital punishment justice, deterrence, safety
the arguments against capital puishment biased, cost lives, expensive
Stanley Tookie Williams wrote childrens books and was executed on death row
drug a nonfood chemical substance that can affect the functions and makeup of the body
drug addiction an intense craving for a drug and compulsive, uncontrolled use of the drug despite harm done to the user or other people
drug dependence a condition in which in which discontinuing the use of a drug is extremely difficult, involving psychological or physical symptoms
legalization the process of making the production and sale of drugs legal
criminalization making the use and possession of drugs a criminal offense
decriminalization permitting the use of drugs without incurring criminal penalties
harm reduction a drug policy aimed at reducing the harm that arises from drugs and drug laws
harm principle the view that authorities are sometimes justified in restricting some people's freedom to prevent harm to others
paternalism principle the view that authorities are sometimes justified in limiting people's freedom to prevent them from harming themselves
legal moralism the doctrine that the government is justified in curbing people's freedom in order to force them to obey moral rules
the arguments for legalization wealth creation through taxes, reduction in crime , less money to support organized crime, safety, medical use, personal freedom
the arguments against legalization addictive, altered perception, gateway drug, social costs, increase chances for use by children, health risks
conventional view the idea that sex is morally acceptable only between a man and a woman who are legally married to each other
moderate view the idea that sex is permissible, whether in marriage or not, if consenting partners have a serious emotional connection
liberal view the idea that as long as basic moral standards are respected, any sexual activity engaged in by informed, consenting adults is permissible
homosexuality sexual relations between people of the same sex
why do some consider abstinence pledges to be immoral? because they can cause increased pregnancies
pornography illicit material intended to cause sexual arousal
the percentage of adults who consider themselves lesbian, gay, or bisexual 3.5%
what did greeks believe? that you could be attracted to beauty in either gender
what did plato argue? that homosexual relationships were superior to heterosexual
what did the church argue? that homosexuality is unnatural
why do some people argue against homosexual marriage? because biological children cannot be produced, and that it is unnatural and undermines traditional view of marriage
why do some people argue for homosexual marriage? the love, security, legitimacy, and support that comes via marriage

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