chapter 19 and 20 key terms-neuromuscular medications

chapter 19 and 20 key terms-neuromuscular medications

Question Answer
adrenergic antagonist drugs that stimulate and mimic the actions of the sympathetic nervous system also called sympthominetics
adrenergic receptors receptor sites for the sympathetic enurotramsitters norepinephrine and epinephrine
a-adrenergic receptros a class of adrenergic receptors that is further subdivided into a1- and a2 receptors – regulated by specific autonomic nerve fibres
a1 and a2 receptors exist postsynaptically
a2 receptors also exist presynaptically
autonomic nervous system branch of peripheral nervous system that controls autonomic bodily functions; consists of sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous system
B-adrenergic receptors subdivide into B1 and B2 located on postsynaptic cells that are stimulated by autonomic nerve fibers
B1 adrenergic fibres are located primarily in the heart
B2 adrenergic fibres are located primarily in the smooth muscle fibres of the bronchioles, arterioles, and visceral organs
catecholamines substances that can produce sympathomimetic response
endogenous catecholamines epinephrine norepinephrine and dopamine
synthetic catecholamine drugs dobutamine
dopaminergic receptor third type of adrenergic receptor; located in various tissues and organs
dopaminergic receptors are activated by the binding of the neurotransmitter dopamine
mudriasis pupillary dilation; whether natural or drug induced
opthalmics drugs that are used in the eye
positive chronotropic effect increased heart rate
positive dromotripic effect increase in the conduction of cardiac electrical impulses through the atrioventricular node
positive dromotropic effect results in transfer of nerve action potentials from the atria to the ventricles; ultimately leads to a systolic heartbeat (ventricular contractions)
positive inotropic effect increase in the force of contraction of the heart muscle (myocardium)
sympathomimetics drugs used therapeutically that mimic catecholamines epinephrine, norepinephrine, and dopamine
synaptic cleft space between two adjacent nerve cell membranes or a nerve cell membrane and organic cell membrane
synaptic cleft is where neurotransmitters are released and the postsynaptic cleft is on which neurotransmitters act
acrocyanosis decreased amount of oxygen delivery to the extremities causing the feet or hands to turn blue
angina paroxysmal (sudden) chest pain case by myocardial ischemia
dysrythmias irregular heart rhythms, almost always called arrhythmias in clinical practive
extravasation leaking of fluid from a blood vessel into the surrounding tissues. in the case of an infiltrated intravenous infusion
first-dose phenomenon severe and sudden drop in blood pressure after the administration of the first dose of an a-adrenergic blocker
intrinsic sympathomimetic actibity the paradoxical action of some B-blocking drugs that mimic the activity of the sympathetic nervous system
lipophilicity the chemical attraction of a substance to lipid or fat molecules
orthostatic hypotension a sudden drop on blood pressure when a person stands up; also called postural hypotension or orthostasis
pheochromocytoma a vascular adrenal gland tumour that is usually benign but secretes epinephrine and norepinephrine
extra secretion of epinephrine and norepinephrine causes CNS stimulation and substantial BP elevation
Raynauds disease narrowing of small arteries that limits the amount of blood circulation to the extremities causing numbness of nose fingers toes and ears in response to col
Sympatholytics drugs that inhibit the post ganglions functioning of the sympathetic nervous system

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *